This Pen Can Draw Every Single Color In The World – Huff Post #Tech

By Kate Bratskeir

Imagine, instead of being forced to resort to “Forest Green” for the grass in your next masterpiece, you could take Photoshop’s “eyedropper” tool to extract the color from a single, blade of grass and turn that color into ink.

Scribble is a new device that lets you do just that. The pen matches hues from the world around you and transfers them onto paper or a mobile device. For the latter, the tool works in conjunction with a stylus and a mobile app to sync the colors that attract you onto your phone or tablet. Pretty cool.

The pen is armed with a 16-bit RGB color sensor that stores the colors you tell it to. Hold the device up to your friend’s gorgeous blonde hair, a vibrant flower or the pizza crust on your plate and Scribble will analyze the color and reproduce it with ink from its refillable cartridges.

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Ex-Inmate’s Court Fees Surged 1,000% While He Was In Prison. Now He Struggles To Buy Food

By Robbie Couch

When he was convicted of three drug charges in Washington state and sentenced to prison, he owed $1,800 in court fees — $600 for each charge. Shaw told HuffPost Live on Wednesday that the judge had stated those charges could be paid after he became a free man once again.

Upon his release from prison 14 years later, however, that number had skyrocketed to $21,000 — about a 1,066 percent increase. Shaw had been told during his 10th year behind bars that while he was serving the rules had changed — those charges had been collecting interest at Washington’s staggering rate of 12 percent.

“When I go to apply for a job, when I go to try to get a vehicle, or when I try to do anything where I need to run credit, they see I owe $21,000, and that makes it hard,” Shaw said, also noting he frequently has to choose between basic everyday purchases, like food and gas, or paying off his legal financial obligations (LFOs).

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Rachel Jeantel Graduates High School, Chases Her Dreams With The Help Of A Village

By Danielle Cadet

The last few years have been tough for Rachel Jeantel. After the death of her friend, Trayvon Martin, she not only had to serve as a witness at his shooter’s trial, but she was also subjected to public criticism and ridicule. But the young woman refused to be held down, keeping a promise she made to Martin and continuing to achieve success.

They say it takes a village to raise a child, and Jeantel’s story is a perfect example of how true that is. The 20-year-old graduated from high school with the help of a team of individuals who offered their mentorship, advice and support, The Washington Post reports.

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Where’s the Automation in the Productivity Accounts? | Jared Bernstein (@EconJared)|

Yesterday’s productivity report for 2014q1 was predictably negative—we already knew that real GDP fell in the quarter while employment grew apace—but I don’t read much into the noisy quarterly changes.

But then there’s this: year-over-year, productivity growth was up 1% last year and has averaged 0.8% since 2011. The figure below plots the yearly changes, which are themselves pretty noisy. What’s more instructive is the smooth trend through the numbers.

The trend suggests that the pace of productivity growth has decelerated since the first half of the 2000s and this begs an important question. There’s considerable speculation that the pace at which machines are displacing workers has accelerated. I keep hearing about “the end of work” based on the assumption that the pace of labor-saving technology—robots, AI—has accelerated.

Continue reading Where’s the Automation in the Productivity Accounts? | Jared Bernstein (@EconJared)|

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