Don’t Harsh Our Mellow, Dude – NYTimes.com

Maureen Dowd
Maureen Dowd

The caramel-chocolate flavored candy bar looked so innocent, like the Sky Bars I used to love as a child.

Sitting in my hotel room in Denver, I nibbled off the end and then, when nothing happened, nibbled some more. I figured if I was reporting on the social revolution rocking Colorado in January, the giddy culmination of pot Prohibition, I should try a taste of legal, edible pot from a local shop.

Not at first. For an hour, I felt nothing. I figured I’d order dinner from room service and return to my more mundane drugs of choice, chardonnay and mediocre-movies-on-demand.


I left a very brief comment. Click here to read it.

Curated from www.nytimes.com

The American Dream Is Alive—and It’s Really, Really Tiny – The Atlantic

By Chris Heller

How did this Portland couple go from $30,000 of debt to homeownership? They ditched many of their material possessions, quit the jobs they hated, and settled down in a 128-square-foot cottage. “Part of the reason we moved into a tiny house,” they explain, “was to get rid of all this stuff and the trappings of daily life.”

To watch the video clip on The Atlantic site, click here:


 

Curated from www.theatlantic.com

The Endless Civil War, Continued – The Atlantic

James Fallows

Over the past few weeks, my wife Deb and I have been reporting on Mississippi’s efforts to move itself up from the bottom in rankings of educational achievement, and similarly to move itself up from being overall the poorest state in the nation.

Question for the day, from readers: whether any success it achieves will necessarily come at the expense of other places, especially in the North. Of course movement in rankings is by definition zero-sum. The real question is whether greater prosperity for Mississippi has to mean less somewhere else.

Continue reading The Endless Civil War, Continued – The Atlantic

The Two Kinds of Bowe Bergdahl Backlash – The Atlantic

No sooner had the yellow ribbons started to come down from the trees than the backlash started up. Not everyone is delighted about the Obama administration’s deal to free American POW Bowe Bergdahl by exchanging him for five Guantanamo Bay prisoners.

It’s pretty easy to view this cynically, as a sign that in these times, everything is political and the country can’t come together over anything. And to a certain extent that’s true: If dueling, pro-forma charges of politicization from official Democratic and Republican spokesmen don’t instill pessimism, what will? But while there are plenty of controversies that seem far from producing any meaningful revelations, despite extensive inquiry—Benghazi comes to mind—there are important constitutional and policy issues at stake in this case.

Continue reading The Two Kinds of Bowe Bergdahl Backlash – The Atlantic

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