compassion

Simon the Just taught: “The world rests upon three things: Torah, service to God, and showing loving-kindness (chesed)” (Pirkei Avot 1:2). Loving-kindness is here the core ethical virtue.

Loving-kindness is closely linked with compassion in the tradition. Lack of compassion marks a people as cruel (Jer. vi. 23). The repeated injunctions of the Law and the Prophets that the widow, the orphan and the stranger should be protected show how deeply, it is argued, the feeling of compassion was rooted in the hearts of the righteous in ancient Israel.

Friendship is also highly prized in the Talmud; the very word for “associate” is “friend” (“chaver“). “Get thyself a companion” (Abot i. 6). “Companionship or death” (Ta’an. 23a).

Respect for one’s fellow creatures is of such importance that Biblical prohibitions may be transgressed on its account (Ber. 19b). Especially do unclaimed dead require respectful burial (see Burial in Jewish Encyclopedia iii. 432b: “met miẓwah”).

Source: Wikipedia